Points of Interest

This page lists the points of interest found in all of our mountain bike routes here at Fat Tyres. These could be mountains, rivers, towns, castles, lakes, even ancient stone circles! If anything takes your fancy on these pages, simply click on the photograph for a list of routes featuring that particular item.

Eastern slope of Great Dummacks

Great Dummacks is a 663m fell in the Howgill Fells range, which sits quietly between the Lake District and the Yorkshire Dales. Its little sister, Little Dummacks, sits alongside. Both fells are a short detour from the classic Bowderdale route, but worth it if you're a peak bagger with a list to complete!

Seatoller

Seatoller is a small hamlet in the Borrowdale area of the Lake District. It sits nestled amongst dramatic mountainous scenery at the foot of the Honister Pass with its famous slate mine.

There's a pub and shops for refreshments, and a public toilet here as well as Tourist Information selling maps and guides. There are no bridleways directly from Seatoller but it features in many routes as Honister Pass gives great road access to several high altitude bridleways.

'That's some chimney!', a curiosity at Weasdale

Weasdale is a small village in the Howgill Fells in Cumbria, about 10km (6mi) south-east of Kirkby Stephen. Two bridleways go north through fields and both meet at Wath about 1km away. East on the road is the only way in/out for motor vehicles and this takes you to Newbiggin-on-Lune and the A685 or, with another bridleway through a few fields, to Ravenstonedale.

Rosthwaite

This small settlement in the Borrowdale area of the Lake District is set amongst dramatic scenery in a spectacular area of the Lakes.

The village itself sits at the foot of Birkett's Leap, a superb technical descent that drops down from Watendlath Tarn. It also lies directly on the route of the Cumbria Way and close to the route of the Allerdale Ramble, making it a popular place with mountain bikers and walkers alike.

In Rosthwaite you'll find the usual refreshment stops - a shop and a couple of pubs, with beer gardens with a view.

Watendlath Fell

Watendlath Fell is 515m fell in the English Lake District that sits between Borrowdale in the west, and the Thirlmere valley in the east.

There is one bridleway that crosses the fell and it is best ridden in the SSE direction. This is accessed from the road to the north with climbs from Derwent Water in the Borrowdale valley to Watendlath Tarn, via the well-known and oft-visited Ashness Bridge and its stunning viewpoint.

From the tarn, the road turns to bridleway. You can cross the stream to the right, just before the tarn. This would take you away from Watendlath Fell, climbing Bowdergate Gill before dropping off for the well-known technical descent of Birkett's Leap.

Instead of crossing the stream, turn left and climb the steep track to the left of the buildings. After about 200m of climbing, pass through a gate and turn right. Now, heading in a SSE direction, the trail flanks Middle Crag with Watendlath Fell across Bleatarn Gill to your right. The track gradually steepens before topping out at about 500m before the descent starts. From here the track first drops to the banks of Blea Tarn (popular for fishing), then continues its descent in a easterly direction towards Harrop Tarn and Dob Gill, for an excellent woodland section that eventually will regurgitate you out onto the banks of Thirlmere and the minor road hugging its western bank.

In the summer there's a small cafe at Watendlath Farm, a lovely place to stop for refreshments.

Sandwick

Sandwick is a small hamlet on the south-eastern bank of Ullswater between Hallin Fell and Sleet Fell. Due to the healthy amount of bridleways in the area a lot of routes pass through here, including the Ullswater lakeside route and many others:

The centre of Elterwater

Elterwater is a picturesque village in the Lake District valley of Great Langdale, and close to the lake of Elter Water from which it get its name.

There are plenty of mountain bike opportunities in the nearby Great Langdale valley, and of course Loughrigg Terrace with its stunning views over Grasmere and Rydal Water.

Loadpot Hill, Trig Point

Loadpot Hill is a 671m (2,201ft) fell in the High Street range of mountains in the north-eastern Lake District. The bridleway runs close to the summit. In the north-eastern direction it descends in the form of some lovely singletrack across Barton Fell to The Cockpit stone circle where there's a choice of directions, all downhill, and include the awesome descent to Howtown

Another track takes you east to Keldhead and the main trail goes south following the former route of the High Street roman road the High Street summit and beyond.

Paved route of Cleveland Way

The Cleveland Way is a long distance footpath which is named after the county of Cleveland, but in fact is mostly based the North Yorkshire Moors National Park.

The route starts in Helmsley in the south-west of the national park and makes its way north along the western edge of the moors. From here it flanks the Cleveland escarpment - which makes up the northern edge of the moors, heading generally north-easterly towards the coast at Saltburn. From Saltburn, the route hugs England's north-east coast until its end and Filey Brigg, over 100 miles from the start.

Unfortunately for us mountain bikers, as is the case for most long distance trails, it is not possible to ride the whole length of the Way. A lot of it is footpath. Despite this, as a lot is also bridleway, many routes in the area are made up of, at least in part, the Cleveland Way.

Swaledale sheep and the Howgill Fells

The Howgill Fells are in the often overlooked area of Cumbria between the Yorkshire Dales and the Lake District. And they benefit from it too in that riding around here gets you the best of both worlds - a strange mix of the rocky peaks of the Lakes and rolling grassing hills of the Dales.

The fact that there's a bridleway running right down the ridge, crossing the highest point at the summit of The Calf just serves to enhance the Howgill Fells as a mountain biking destination even more. The descent beyond the calf is stunning wilderness singletrack for miles.

If you're heading this way then head for Sedbergh, which is the best base to start from for any Howgill rides.

Overlooking Ullswater from Long Crag on Barton Fell

Barton Fell, at the northern end of the High Street range of mountains overlooks Ullswater in the north-eastern Lake District. The High Street roman road descends south to north from Loadpot Hill to The Cockpit on Askham Fell.

There are numerous route options from here leading in all directions: west gets you on the descent to Howtown, and Ullswater beyond; north heads to Roehead and Pooley Bridge, or the Celleron roman fort; north-east leads across Askham Fell to the village of Askham; and south-east crosses Moor Divock to drop you on the road near Helton.

Beyond Loadpot Hill to the south, traverses the High Street ridge, eventually crossing its summit and leading to Windermere far beyond.

River Esk above Ruswarp

The River Esk flows west to east along Esk Dale in the north of the North Yorkshire Moors. The Esk Valley Railway also follows most of its length. The river's source is near Westerdale, high in the moors and it finally empties into the sea 45km (28mi) later at Whitby. The entire length is contained within the national park.

Cleveland Hills

The Cleveland Hills are a bit of a Mecca for mountain bikers in the area. They mark the northern and western edges of the North Yorkshire Moors and are literally littered with awesome trails.

There's Guisborough Woods in the east which is full of forest tracks and tons of hidden singletrack short-cuts through the woods. Then there's Clay Bank of course, with its popular car park making it a great base for a great selection of rides. And of course you've got Carlton Bank where there's a downhill course, and that's just a small taste of what's available round here.

Little Langdale Tarn

Great Langdale's smaller cousin, Little Langdale, lies in the heart of the English Lake District.

The disused quarry to the south creates the fun and can be linked up to several routes.

Saltergate Bank

Saltergate Bank is a tough road climb on the A169 Whitby to Pickering road in the North Yorkshire Moors. It climbs from Saltergate Moor to above the Hole of Horcum. Access to Levisham Moor is half way up the bank on the west.

Rosedale

Rosedale is a valley in the North York Moors National Park, it runs north-west to south-east and divides Blakey Ridge from Rosedale Moor.

On its eastern banks the remains of several old mine buildings add extra interest.

Several route options are available, most of which take advantage of the dismantled mine railway that flanks the whole valley, a reminder of times gone by.

Sheep on Castleton Rigg

Castleton Rigg is a rigg in the North York Moors between the dales of Westerdale and Danby Dale. Its highest point is at 326m above sea level. The road that runs its length (north to south) leads to Castleton in the north and Blakey Ridge in the south.

Bridleways lead off the rigg in both easterly and westerly directions, opening up a fair bit of terrain for mountain biking. There are also bridleways that break up the road sections if you're cycling its length.

Bridleway up Grisedale

Grisedale is the valley between Birkhouse Moor (to the north) and St Sunday Crag and Birks (to the south) in the Lake District. With Grisedale Tarn and the Helvellyn range at the head, and Patterdale and Ullswater at the bottom, Grisedale is about 5.5km (3.5mi) long.

A single bridleway stretches it’s length, forming part of a lot of Helvellyn routes, or over Grisedale Hause to drop down into Grasmere to the south-west. The path itself is fairly wide and quite rocky and can be ridden as either a ascent or descent just as well.

Hayeswater

Hayeswater is a small reservoir close to Ullswater in the north-eastern Lake District. Nestled between Gray Crag, The Knott and High Street, its single bridleway leads down a fast hard-packed double track descent of Hayeswater Gill to Hartsop (best ridden in the other direction to access the High Street range). And to the north east the bridleway leads up to The Knott and on to the High Street range, although the actual whereabouts of the bridleway on this section is not clear and you'll probably end up pushing the bike through the middle of the field until it joins the footpath near the top.

Chapel Stile, Great Langdale

Chapel Stile is a lovely village at the head of Great Langdale in the central Lake District. The road through the village leads west toward the Old Dungeon Ghyll Hotel in one of the lake district's lakeless dales, Great Langdale, and east to Elterwater and beyond, eventually leading to Ambleside.

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