Points of Interest

This page lists the points of interest found in all of our mountain bike routes here at Fat Tyres. These could be mountains, rivers, towns, castles, lakes, even ancient stone circles! If anything takes your fancy on these pages, simply click on the photograph for a list of routes featuring that particular item.

Seatoller

Seatoller is a small hamlet in the Borrowdale area of the Lake District. It sits nestled amongst dramatic mountainous scenery at the foot of the Honister Pass with its famous slate mine.

There's a pub and shops for refreshments, and a public toilet here as well as Tourist Information selling maps and guides. There are no bridleways directly from Seatoller but it features in many routes as Honister Pass gives great road access to several high altitude bridleways.

On Calders

Calders is a 674m (2,211ft) summit on Brant Fell in the Howgill Fells in Cumbria. It is on right on the main bridleway, meaning most routes around here reach the summit.

There’s a short track to the east which gets you to the summit of Great Dummacks and back. North climbs The Calf followed by the amazing singletrack descent into Bowderdale. The track to the south crosses the ridge of Rowantree Grains, before decending past the summit of Arant Haw to Winder, and beyond, eventually dropping down to Sedbergh.

Sedbergh, Market Town

Sedbergh is a town in the Yorkshire Dales and a great base for exploring the Howgill Fells. To the north there are two routes onto Winder, giving access to The Calf via the mountain ridge, and beyond to Bowderdale or one of the various other bridleway options once you're up there.

East gets you deeper into the Yorkshire Dales, via road. South-east leads to Dentdale, east goes to Garsdale and north-east follows the River Rawthey, leading to Ravenstonedale and eventually Kirkby Stephen.

Leaving the Cleveland Way at Bloworth Crossing

Bloworth Crossing is the site of a crossroads on the former Rosedale Ironstone Railway in the North York Moors. What were once rail lines are now public bridleways, so Bloworth Crossing forms a major junction for many mountain bike routes. It also sits on the Cleveland Way long distance footpath.

The northern track follows the Cleveland Way, staying close to the edge of the moors and overlooking the Tees Valley. After about three miles there's a junction for the Bank Foot descent.

The eastern trail follows an easy, meandering, dismantled railway route across the moor to the Lion Inn on Blakey Ridge, and gives access to the Rosedale routes.

South traverses Rudland Rigg, an easy climb and descent good for either beginners or for joining up other route sections.

The west path soon forks. The left fork follos the Cleveland Way across Urra Moor. The right leads to the Ingleby Incline, which although would make blisteringly fast descent, would be a bit of a waste of altitude and is best ridden as a (tough!) climb onto the moors and up to Bloworth Crossing.

Bridleway up Grisedale

Grisedale is the valley between Birkhouse Moor (to the north) and St Sunday Crag and Birks (to the south) in the Lake District. With Grisedale Tarn and the Helvellyn range at the head, and Patterdale and Ullswater at the bottom, Grisedale is about 5.5km (3.5mi) long.

A single bridleway stretches it’s length, forming part of a lot of Helvellyn routes, or over Grisedale Hause to drop down into Grasmere to the south-west. The path itself is fairly wide and quite rocky and can be ridden as either a ascent or descent just as well.

Castleton Moor Station

Castleton is a village in the North Yorkshire Moors. The River Esk runs through which makes it a tourist hot spot in the summer months. There are a couple of pubs and a shop for refreshments and the Esk Valley Railway also has a stop here.

Routes in and out are mainly roads and footpaths, of which there are many around here. But there is one bridelway which comes in from Commondale to the north-west and runs along the north bank of the River Esk and re-joins the road just before Danby to the east.

Danby Village

Danby is a village in Esk Dale in the North Yorkshire Moors. There's a tearoom serving refreshments at The Moors Centre. There is also a station here on the Esk Valley Railway. There are three bridleways that drop in off Danby Low Moor in the north, these are known as Siss Cross Road, Pannierman's Causeway and Lord's Turnpike.

Cairn on Danby Rigg

Danby Rigg is a rigg in the North Yorkshire Moors. It divides Danby Dale to its west from Little Fryup Dale to its east. Its namesake, the village of Danby, lies to the north, there are shops here serving refreshments as well as a small visitors centre. To the south is Danby High Moor which has a couple of roads leading onto it, meeting at a small carpark in the centre.

Commondale from the edge of Commondale Moor

Commondale is a hamlet in the North Yorkshire Moors. There's a small tearoom here serving refreshments and a station on the Esk Valley Railway.

There are two offroad routes out of the village. The first heads east from the village centre following the field boundary. The second starts a short distance south and also heads east through fields. Both meet to become a single trail that heads south east down Esk Dale, roughly following the rail line, to Castleton. After the brief interuption of a short road section this bridleway continues to Danby, or to join Pannierman's Causeway, opening up several options.

Loughrigg Fell/Grasmere/Rydal

Loughrigg Fell stands at 335m overlooking Grasmere, Rydal Water, Ambleside and Windermere in the Lake District. The main trail here is Loughrigg Terrace which is fast, fun and beautifully scenic.

Cairn, White Side

White Side is a fell in the Lake District which is part of the Helvellyn mountain range, situated between the Thirlmere and Glenridding valleys. Standing at 863m (2,831ft) above sea level, White Side sits between Raise and Lower Man and forms part of most Helvellyn routes.

Bridleways stretch out in four directions, with the main rocky trail that follows the ridge leading to Raise to the north and Lower Man and Helvellyn itself to the south. The westerly bridleway descends steeply via Brown Crag to the Thirlspot car park on Thirlmere. The eastern trail is also a steep descent dropping into Keppel Cove and leading past the youth hostel and eventually delivering you into Glenridding.

Both north and south directions make fast descents followed by a climb, and in the other direction make for perfectly rideable ascents. The easterly bridleway drops down very steeply for some very technical riding, and as an ascent requires shouldering the bike. The westerly bridleway is fast and steep but should be rideable at a push as a climb too.

Boredale Hause looking towards St Sunday Crag

Boredale Hause is a mountain pass close to Patterdale at the southern tip of Ullswater in the Lake District. It passes between Place Fell and Angletarn Pikes and rises to 399m at the top.

In typical lakeland pass style, the descent at both sides of the Hause are rocky but fast paths. On the west side there are two bridleways, one heading down to Patterdale and the other to Hartsop with the east side offering a descent into Boredale or a track that takes you onto and over Beda Fell before a singletrack descent into Bannerdale.

Both directions are great fun with the best probably being west to east which takes in the long descent that flanks Place Fell and drops into the Boredale valley.

Ullswater

Ullswater is the second largest lake in the Lake District. It sits at approximately 9 miles long and is surrounded by a maze of bridleways, especially to the south, making it an ideal base for mountain biking. If you’re looking to go riding here then there are many hotels, B&Bs and campsites in the area and Patterdale, Glenridding, Pooley Bridge, and Howtown make for the perfect base for exploring the lake and the surrounding mountains by bike.

Here you’ll find the Ullswater lakeside bridleway, the famous High Street roman road and plenty of routes for all abilities including some real Lake District classics. Try one of our routes in the area, or simply go exploring – there’s something for everyone!

Back on the Cumbria Way

The Cumbria Way is a long distance footpath in the Lake District that stretches right the way from Ulverston in the south to Carlisle in the north. A lot of it is footpath only but there are some fantastic parts of bridleway too, such the section from Great Langdale right the way to Rosthwaite in Borrowdale, via the famous Stake Pass. And also of note the route on and around Skiddaw, particularly the Lonscale Crags area.

River Esk above Ruswarp

The River Esk flows west to east along Esk Dale in the north of the North Yorkshire Moors. The Esk Valley Railway also follows most of its length. The river's source is near Westerdale, high in the moors and it finally empties into the sea 45km (28mi) later at Whitby. The entire length is contained within the national park.

Hartsop

Hartsop is a small hamlet close to Brothers Water in the north-eastern part of the Lake District. It lies just off the A592 between Ullswater and the Kirkstone Pass, and is surrounded the high peaks of Hartsopp Dodd and Brock Crags.

Its name in Norman means 'valley of the dear', and there are some fine examples of Norman era buildings including the remains of a drying kiln and a water mill. Since then the village has been a lead mining community and is now more of a tourist attraction.

The surrounding landscape is mountainous and provides plenty of opportunity for getting out in the hills on your bike. Hartsop sits right on the bridleway that leads to Hayeswater and onto the High Street range beyond. It also has a trail running north and climbing Boredale Hause, with the Boredale and Beda Fell descents beyond.

Askham Fell

Askham Fell is a small (323m) hill near Pooley Bridge and Ullswater. It is criss-crossed with good bridleways leading to Pooley Bridge, Celleron roman fort, Askham, Loadpot Hill, and down one of the country's best descents to Howtown. All of these trails meet at a stone circle forming the central junction, known as The Cockpit.

White Lion at Patterdale

Patterdale is a village in the Ullswater valley in the Lake District. It is situated on the A592 just south of Glenridding at the southern tip of Ullswater.

The White Lion Inn and The Patterdale Hotel both offer great food and post-ride beers, the latter has a beer garden perfect for those hot summer days, and also offers accomodation.

As a base for mountain biking, Patterdale can offer a variety of routes. The Helvellyn range to the west is very popular, with a huge choice of routes on offer. Similarly the High Street range to the east offers endless possibilities. Any route that starts in Glenridding can also be started in Patterdale just as easily.

Boredale

Boredale is dale near Ullswater in the north-eastern Lake District, it runs from north to south between Place Fell, High Dodd and Beda Fell. The road from Howtown runs most of its length before turning into a bridleway at boredale head.

The afformentioned bridleway is the only one in the valley, but plays an important part in many routes as it lead up to (or down from) Boredale Hause where several routes meet. These allow access to Hartsop, Patterdale and Ullswater to the west, or up and over Beda Fell into Bannerdale to the east. It is rideable in both directions, save a short section of boulder-field you may have to carry for.

North leads, via road, to a fork where left gets you to Sandwick and the lakeside trail and right gets you to Howtown for either a pleasant quiet road saunter along the banks of Ullswater to Pooley Bridge, or to The Cockpit, by riding its descent to Howtown as a climb.

The Honister Pass

Honsiter Pass is a mountain pass in the Lake District. It carries a road from Borrowdale to Gatesgarthdale and passes between the fells of Dale Head and Grey Knotts. It is well known for its slate mine at the top, which has visitor centre as well as various fell-based activities such as rock climbing and a zip wire.

The pass is most often used by mountain bikers as a road climb giving access to the surrounding fells. A bridleway rises steeply on its south side and climbs Fleetwith Pike before descending just as steeply and eventually ending up at Buttermere. A second rather scenic route leaves the road about half way up the eastern side and follows the contours around Dale Head and High Scawdel before meeting with the Allerdale Ramble and dropping down into Borrowdale via a descent of Castle Crag.

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